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Buddy the Elf may be able to escape these holiday hazards unscathed in the classic Christmas film Elf but what happens when decorating goes wrong in real life? From ladders, to trees, lights, and hot glue guns, Emergency Room nurses know all too well how dangerous the holidays can be.

According to an annual study from the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), holiday-decorating injuries are on the rise over the past few years. Last year’s reports from the nation’s ERs came in at 15,000 injuries over the holiday season, up from 12,000 in 2009. CPSC Spokeswoman Kim Dulic noted that the numbers come out to 250 people a day being treated for holiday-related injuries.

Other Stats:

  • More than 1/3 of holiday injuries caused by falls
  • 11% of injuries caused by cuts
  • 10% of injuries caused by back strain
  • The remaining percentage were unidentified causes
  • 200 fires caused by Christmas tree fires resulting in $16 million in damage.

This holiday season we recommend you use energy efficient lights that do not burn hot, have a friend spot you whenever you step on a ladder or step-stool, make sure your decorations are hung securely, and finally be careful with those holiday cocktail parties.

We have all been taught not to drink and drive but this year the CPSC is warning people not to mix tasty holiday cocktails with tree-trimming festivities. Doctors and nurses are saying they have already treated dozens of injuries resulting from cases of DUI – decorating under the influence of intoxicants.

“It’s easy to take shortcuts during a busy holiday, but Dulic and the nation’s ER docs say you better watch out –and not just for Santa Claus. ‘We want people to put safety first this holiday season,’ she said. “  -NBCNEWS.COM.

To see the original NBC News article, “When ‘Ho-ho’ turns to ‘Oh, no!’ “ click HERE